Group of people standing on a patio

Who else knows what you’re facing after a workplace injury, illness, or death, except those who’ve also been there? Our volunteer family guides, our regional family forums, and even the stories shared in our newsletter or blog, are all built around the central theme of families helping families. You’ll even find peer support reflected in our mission and values.

At the centre of everything we do here at Threads of Life, you’ll find a beating heart of peer support.

In the above photo, you’ll find a group of teens and adults who have all experienced the death of a sibling or parent to an on-the-job injury. When this photo was taken, they’d just finished a family forum session together. This is just a glimpse into the kind of connection and support possible when we bring families together.

In 2019, Global Peer Supporter Celebration Day will be October 17. Please join us in extending heartfelt thanks to those who are there to listen and accompany others through dark days and profoundly deep pain. It takes very special people to give of themselves in this way. It takes both courage and empathy to look into the eyes of a person grieving a great loss and simply listen. Patiently and without judgement. To sit on the phone with you while you work through the really hard and painful pieces. To listen, without trying to correct or fix what cannot be fixed is not an easy thing to do. It’s also the most considerate and healing gift you can give to someone in great pain.

As our primary peer supporters, our 44 active volunteer family guides have each been personally affected by a life-altering workplace injury, occupational disease, or a traumatic fatality. Each has paid the exorbitant price of admission to a club that no one wants to join, and they want to ensure that others know they’re not alone. They’ve taken a 5-day intensive training session, and participate in ongoing professional development.

Connecting with others who have shared a similar experience helps to heal. When faced with a devastating workplace injury, illness, or death, the scariest place to be is alone. Here, you don’t have to be.

Thank you to our peer supporters, our volunteer family guides! Your dedication and courage in companioning others after a workplace injury, illness, or death, is helping hurting people to heal.

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Sarah Wheelan

Sarah Wheelan is the Communications Coordinator for Threads of Life. She has a background in health and safety, and has also been personally affected by a workplace tragedy.
Sarah Wheelan
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