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Coping in the wake of tragedy

Coping in the wake of tragedy

Young paramedic finds help to deal with PTSD By Michael Johnson If you had asked me what I wanted to do after graduation it was a quick answer. I wanted to be a paramedic. Little did I know this decision would change my life in ways I could never imagine, for better...

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Ontario Petroleum Contractors’ Association: Sharing the message and the mission

Ontario Petroleum Contractors’ Association: Sharing the message and the mission

The strongest partnerships are built on a foundation of shared values and goals. Threads of Life is lucky to have many such strong partnerships. We have been working with the Ontario Petroleum Contractors’
Association (OPCA) for a decade, and are honoured to continue to build and strengthen this relationship. OPCA’s executive director Michelle Rae shared a little bit about how the partnership began and what it means to OPCA.

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Volunteer Profile: Treena Dixon

Volunteer Profile: Treena Dixon

When you look for a role model who embodies the definition of community engagement and commitment, Treena Dixon is someone who demonstrates that in many ways. Treena has been involved as a volunteer with Threads of Life since 2011, after moving to the Red Deer region in 2009, serving in numerous roles including co-Chair of the Steps for Life Red Deer committee.

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Writing your story for healing and sharing

Writing your story for healing and sharing

I have a confession: as a writer, I get a little sick of the word “share”. We use it all the time, after all – we’re always encouraging family members to share their stories. It’s right there in our Threads of Life values! It’s also core to our programs – family members share their stories when they’re paired with a volunteer family guide; they’re encouraged to share experiences at family forums, and there’s always an opportunity for personal sharing during our FamiliesConnect workshops. 

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Forty years does not lessen the heartache

Forty years does not lessen the heartache

On February 24, 1979, 16 miners entered No. 26 Colliery in Glace Bay, Nova Scotia, to begin their shift. They were working the night shift 11pm to 7am. They descended five and a half miles into the No. 12 South wall of the mine, almost 2500 feet below the floor of the Atlantic Ocean. The No. 26 Colliery was the biggest coal producer in the local area for many years and was owned by the Cape Breton Development Corporation, also known as DEVCO.

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From safety professionals to families of workplace tragedy, with love

From safety professionals to families of workplace tragedy, with love

This past April, Threads of Life’s Executive Director Shirley Hickman shared her story at the What If One Health and Safety Forum (WIO) in Vancouver, in a session titled “One Voice Can Make a Difference”. Organizers of the event gave participants a unique opportunity to make a $25 donation in exchange for two Safety and Health Week T-shirts — one to keep and one to use to send a message to a Threads of Life family member – someone who was living with the reality of an on-the-job injury, illness, or fatality. Gabe Guetta, CEO of Salus

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Ryan Durling, 21

Ryan Durling, 21

Ryan was the youngest of three and loved his siblings dearly. He was closest in age to his brother, Mitchell and they were inseparable when they were young. The two could always be found out searching for mud holes with the four wheelers in the summer and hunting rabbits in the winter.

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Threads of Life Scholarship – Helping to make dreams and futures come true

Threads of Life Scholarship – Helping to make dreams and futures come true

When a family is shaken by a workplace tragedy, so many aspects of their individual and shared lives can be affected: emotional, spiritual, physical, and financial included. The Threads of Life Scholarship – made possible through the generous support and funding of the Board of Canadian Registered Safety Professionals (BCRSP) – is a significant support to Threads of Life families, including young workers, looking to build a future through post-secondary education.

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