Steps for Life

Walk with us this May!

Stories of hope

Meet the faces behind the stats

Connect with someone who understands

 

Volunteer Family Guides can help

Working to heal families and bring an end to workplace tragedies

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Stories of Hope

Threads of Life participants and supporters are working to prevent future tragedies by telling their stories and making sure everyone understands why workplace safety is important.

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There is hope …

“It has been a long journey since the death of my husband. Each day is a gift to us and we remember Leo every day. After years of counselling, support from family for myself and the children, and finding Threads of Life we have been able to live a new normal.

-Erin Pitruzella, whose husband Leo, a labourer for a paving company, died when he was struck by a dump truck loaded with asphalt

If today is an average working day in Canada

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Three workers die today

3 Canadian workers will be killed or die as a result of occupational disease

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Hundreds injured today

Hundreds will be seriously injured or made ill because of work

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Thousands affected today

Thousands of families, communities and workplaces will be affected

Our Why: Our Champions, Our Heroes

Our Why: Our Champions, Our Heroes

We would like to thank you for being our CHAMPIONS, our HEROES. So far 2020 is nothing like any of us had planned – COVID-19 put a halt to that. In March, in just a matter of days, everything changed for home, work and play. Nothing was untouched, including Steps for Life. Now that May has come to an end, and we have time to reflect, it is truly remarkable what was accomplished in such a short period of time.

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Learning the Workings of a Family Changed Forever

Learning the Workings of a Family Changed Forever

​September of 2014, I had been a critical care nurse in a busy neuro-trauma intensive care unit for 22 years. I had been with many families over the years whose loved one was going to have life-altering injuries or was going to die from their injuries/illnesses. Being relatively naive and uneducated on the long-term effects of grief, I just assumed that they would be sad for a while but eventually their lives would return to normal. I have learned that karma has a nasty way of showing you reality and on September 26th, 2014 I got the hardest lesson of my life when my 17-year-old son Adam was tragically killed at the end of his first week as a co-op student in an auto recycling facility.

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Thank you to our Corporate Sponsors

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NOVA Chemicals logo

Ease the pain of workplace tragedy… help families heal

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