Photo by Tim Marshall on Unsplash

Over 2018, we’ve been highlighting the many ways our partners and sponsors contribute to Threads of Life’s vision and mission by growing awareness, growing our volunteer base and growing our participation. The fourth piece of the puzzle is growing our revenue.

How you helpThreads of Life’s funding comes from a range of sources and every one of them is crucial. Individual donors form the broad base of our revenues, and these range from people who toss their toonies into a change jar, to givers who’ve signed up for automatic monthly donations (and by the way, every Threads of Life staff and board member is also an individual donor to the organization!)

There are many one-time donations from companies and organizations, whether in response to a speaker presentation, in support of a Steps for Life team, or the result of a fundraiser like a barbecue or golf tournament. Threads of Life couldn’t continue to function without our loyal sponsors and partners in each province and across Canada, who commit to multi-year funding for our programs and events. (Have a look to see our corporate, association and government supporters.) These multi-year commitments provide stability, allowing Threads of Life to plan ahead, knowing there will be enough money to carry out our strategies.

Every year, another 200 family members or more come to Threads of Life looking for support. We’re pleased that they’ve found a safe place to land, and we know they represent just a fraction of the families affected by work-related tragedy.

Our goal is to continue to serve all the families who need help, offering programs like our family forums, Volunteer Family Guides, and newsletters like this one at no charge. Every contribution – from our individual donors to our corporate and government partners – helps Threads of Life to meet the steadily growing need.

Susan Haldane

Susan Haldane

Susan Haldane manages marketing and communications for Threads of Life.
Her background is in journalism, public relations and health and safety.
Susan Haldane
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